MMP Technology: Selective Roughness Treatment for Super Surface Finish

MMP Technology: Selective Roughness Treatment for Super Surface Finish

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J.T.Stone, Vice President of Business development, MMP TechnologyJ.T.Stone, Vice President of Business development
In the times when surface technology highly relied on polishing, BinC Industries, dedicated to industrial markets, developed a high precision micro-machining process (MMP) technology, to obtain super-finished surfaces by selectively removing specific ranges of roughness. The technology differentiates itself from traditional polishing by its ability to finely control the material removal process with just a minuscule of removal as well as achieve matte to brilliant mirror-like finishes with notable advantages such as reproducibility, homogeneity, respect for design, and cost control. MMP technology, being thus advanced in the surface finishing industry, is highly effective across a wide range of materials, including standard stainless and high-speed steels, copper, nickel, titanium alloys, precious metals, carbide, and more. Hence, the technology is used majorly in seven significant fields, namely aerospace, additive manufacturing, medical, plastic injection molds, cutting tools, and forge, stamping, and die for various purposes such as friction reduction, fluid retention, coating adhesion, increasing life time of the parts, and so on.

MMP technology considers the most significant aspect related to the technology to be focusing on surface roughness from an engineered standpoint. J.T.Stone, Vice President of business development in MMP technology, says, “Our technology characterizes surface roughness profiles of any given manufactured part, with that we design and engineer a final roughness profile to do a specific job.” He further explains the working of the MMP technology that adopts a mix of mechanical and catalytic process, super-precision engineered finishing technology that starts with measuring surface roughness through a Fourier transform to break the surface roughness down into electrical signals. These signals help in understanding the number of roughness frequencies present in the product, with which the company arrives at the overall frequency of roughness and filters through them by selectively removing specific roughness frequencies to achieve the usable state of the product.

Thus, the company has formed a cutting tool that is keyed to the roughness being targeted and selectively removes specific roughness frequencies, and finally fine-tunes the surface until the desired critical roughness frequency is achieved. This innovative process of MMP technology enables the technology to obtain and control the super-finishes of surfaces at a level of homogeneity and reproducibility never reached before.

In addition to the expertise exhibited through its technology, MMP technology has also offered a best-in-class solution, Finish3D, combining two key players in the surface finishing industry — extrude-hone and MMP technology, to provide a solution for any part made by metal additive manufacturing. The tremendous production of additive manufacturing has exhibited its ability to build parts with very complex geometries that have never been seen before with any other manufacturing process. However, these products generally have a very high surface roughness when they are printed. “Knowing your weakness is as important as knowing your strength,” goes an old proverb. MMP technology validates this proverb by understanding the limitations of MMP when it comes to internal passageways and joins hands with extrude-hone technology to achieve the desired overall surface finish.


Our technology characterizes surface roughness profiles of any given manufactured part, with that we design and engineer a final roughness profile to do a specific job

Extrude-hone excels in the internal passageways, however, with a limitation of removing much more material than needed and ultimately changing the geometry of the part. MMP technology considers this limitation and makes a product to go through the extrude-honing process just when it is printed, and once the printed surface achieves better surface roughness, the extrude honing is stopped. Then, the MMP technology takes over to reach the final roughness target. As Finish3D is a product of two separate technologies, it proves more beneficial for high volume components, as the development and testing costs can be a limitation for low volume production.

With all these technologies and solutions explained, the application of the technology still remains obscure without a real-life success story of the company. For this real-life sample, the white paper by NASA focusing on gas turbine engine’s compressor component remains a testimonial to MMP Technology’s success. The white paper states that NASA has found out that finishing to such precision of MMP technology, leads to 0.3 to 0.5 percentage efficiency gain. When this percentage of efficiency is considered from a fuel consumption angle, it is indeed a huge gain for the gas turbine engines. Thus, MMP technology proves its prowess in the real-life application of the technology.
Having such accomplishments and accolades to its honor, the company recognizes the differentiating factor both from organizational and technical standpoints. From the organizational angle, the inventor of the MMP technology, BinC Industries, has strategically opened up production facilities across the globe, considering the markets that flourish in particular areas. All the seven branches of the company are spread out in seven parts of the globe — Europe, the United States, India, Japan, and China — to meet the precise need of the seven major markets. On the other hand, from a technical perspective, the technology looks at roughness from an engineered standpoint and filters through the roughness frequencies that allow the process to reduce wastage nearly ten times compared to other finishing technology. Besides, the geometry of the manufactured parts is never disturbed. On top of all that, the company achieves surface roughness that no other competitors could achieve.

MMP technology, projecting such versatility in the industry of surface technology, faced innumerable challenges when it was initially industrialized in 2002. The then newly arrived MMP technology used a lot of highly technical applications that were revolutionary from a surface finishing standpoint, tailoring to the needs of the high-end industries and markets that the company worked with. However, as the customers remained fairly unfamiliar to the roughness and its treatment, the company schooled its customers on surface roughness and the problems that come along by providing an overall knowledge of what specific application needed by the customer regarding roughness. By presenting surface roughness with an in-depth technical understanding through multiple types of roughness parameters such as total roughness (RT), positive roughness (RP), negative roughness (RV), and skewness of the roughness profile (RFK), the company helps its customers understand and test to figure out the type of actual roughness needed for the component. From these earlier challenges, the company has marched with steady strides with an unfaltering focus on MMP technology. Having fixated on success, MMP technology steadily develops new micro tools and processes that promise perfection in different types of manufacturing techniques, geometry, and roughness to further simplify their process in the future.

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MMP Technology

Company
MMP Technology

Headquarters
Genolier, Switzerland

Management
J.T.Stone, Vice President of Business development

Description
MMP Technology develops a high precision micro-machining process (MMP) technology, to obtain super-finished surfaces by selectively removing specific ranges of roughness from an engineered standpoint. The working of the MMP technology adopts a mix of mechanical and catalytic process, super-precision engineered finishing technology that starts with measuring surface roughness through a Fourier transform to break the surface roughness down into electrical signals. Thus, the company has forms a cutting tool keyed to the roughness being targeted and selectively removes specific roughness frequencies, and finally fine-tunes the surface until the desired critical roughness frequency is achieved